Tag: February 2017 Newsletter

Putting Melbourne on the Map

At BioMedVic, we’ve been brewing up exciting plans for Members.

We are delighted to announce that BioMedVic will be supporting publication of an online interactive research network map produced by Nature Index, which will show output and collaboration in high quality research between institutions in the greater Melbourne region. This updateable map will be based on publications in the top natural science journals tracked by the Nature Index website (www.natureindex.com), which is an open access platform owned by Springer Nature, publisher of Nature, with data published under a creative commons license. Continue reading

CSL’s Principal Sponsorship of UROP to Continue

hengelhardt_brv_urop-welcome-forum_2017_lowres_26-002

Last Thursday, Melbourne Town Hall’s Portico Room lit up with passion for science as BioMedVic held the annual Welcome Forum for the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP). We were thrilled to have UROP students and supervisors share their research experiences and to hear from Dr Andrew Nash, CSL’s Senior Vice President, Research, that CSL will continue as Principal Sponsor of UROP for 2017-2019. Continue reading

Workshop | Clinical Trials Essentials

17-067-pa-biomed-workshopmelb-linkedin-1200x628px2

BioMedVic is pleased to partner with PRAXIS Australia to deliver the Clinical Trials Essentials workshop suite to the Australian clinical trials sector over the next six months. Topics include Privacy in Research, Research Integrity and Clinical Trials, ICH E6 Addendum and Social Media in Research.

BioMedVic Members are eligible for discounts for group bookings of 15 or more – ask PRAXIS for details.

More details here.

Trial to Image “Hearing Brain” of Children Set to Begin

MEMBER FEATURE

BIONICS INSTITUTE

Deaf children may soon hear more clearly, thanks to a Melbourne trial starting in March.

Using a non-invasive technique, Professor Colette McKay and her team at Melbourne’s Bionics Institute will image the “hearing brain” of children – data which could help clinicians tune hearing devices for infants and newborns for a sense of hearing much closer to the real thing. Continue reading