New Genomics Laboratory at St Vincent’s Institute with former UROP scholar at its lead

Former UROP scholar Dr Davis McCarthy has recently joined St Vincent’s Institute (SVI) as Head of the new Bioinformatics and Cellular Genomics Laboratory in a joint appointment with the University of Melbourne. A philanthropic donation made the lab possible, and now funding from the latest NHMRC Project Grant round secures its funding into the future.

As Head of the Bioinformatics and Cellular Genomics Laboratory, Davis McCarthy will establish his group focusing on genomics analysis and methods to interpret the data sets coming from gene sequencing technologies. His research will also explore how changes in DNA affect the gene expression in single cells. Moreover, Davis’ research group will collaborate with other SVI labs that need genomics analysis, thus strengthening SVI’s internal partnerships.

The new Bioinformatics and Cellular Genomics Laboratory was made possible thanks to a philanthropic donation from Mr Paul Holyoake, former SVI Board member, and his wife, Ms Marg Downey.

Davis’ NHMRC Project Grant is one of five awarded to SVI groups in the most recent NHMRC grant round. News of the funding was extremely well-received by Davis, who sees it as vital, enabling support and a fantastic opportunity to fast-track the lab set up to start working.

A researcher with an impeccable career

Davis McCarthy did his UROP placement in 2006 at WEHI. For Davis, his UROP experience “was more than a stepping-stone, it was my introduction to Bioinformatics and a real turning point in my career”. His placement allowed him to discover his interest in Bioinformatics with a genuine, cutting-edge research project. “Without UROP, who knows where I would be today”, says Davis.

After his UROP experience, Davis graduated with Honours from The University of Melbourne and then pursued a PhD at the University of Oxford. He then became a NHMRC CJ Martin post-doctoral fellow and worked at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI, Cambridge UK). Now he’s back in Australia, where he has already secured funding to continue his excellent research!