Healing Wounds for Diabetic Patients

UROP @ ARMI | Natasha Qazi

Having an open wound which doesn’t heal for years is the reality for many people, often diabetics, living with chronic ulcers and slow-healing wounds. Patients need treatment over several years, which makes it extremely expensive, both for the healthcare system and the patients who are continually going in and out of hospital.

Twelve Australians develop diabetes every hour. While the annual healthcare cost for a diabetic person without associated complications can be up to $4,000, complications, such as slow-healing wounds, can increase the cost to $16,000. Read more >

New Frontier for Parkinson’s

UROP @ The Bionics Institute | Aharon Golod

“Not very often do you wake up, knowing you have to go to work and feel excited,” said Aharon Golod. Every day the budding researcher gets to work with cutting-edge technology at the Bionics Institute as part of his UROP placement.

This technology, called deep brain stimulation, while being developed specifically for people with drug-resistant symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, has the potential to treat other neurological disorders, like clinical depression and Tourette’s syndrome. Read more >

Training Science Communicators and Future STEMM Stars

Training Science Communicators and Future STEMM Stars

BioMedVic is investing in the next generation of science communicators by hosting three Masters student interns from the University of Melbourne. The students, who are undertaking a unit in science communication, have been teamed up with scholars of the BioMedVic Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) working at the Bionics Institute and at the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI). Read more >

BioMedVic hosts professional development for HRECs

BioMedVic hosts professional development for HRECs

The BioMedVic Hospital Research Managers were delighted to host an enthusiastic gathering of Victorian HREC Chairs and Executive Officers for a Twilight Education Session on Tuesday 29 August.

Prof David Taylor (Eastern Health) presented his talk “Cannabis 101: New (renewed) uses for an old drug”. Mr James Cameron (DHHS) presented on the changes to the Medical Treatment Planning and Decision Act 2016 in relation to instructional and values directives, appointment of medical treatment decision makers and the impact on a patient’s ability to be involved in medical research. Read more >

Congratulations to Fellowship Recipients

Congratulations to Fellowship Recipients

The three recipients of the Victorian Health and Medical Research Fellowships were announced on July 19. The fellowships are intended to develop initiatives and strategies, leading to clinical or commercial outcomes in the areas of bioinformatics, genomics and/or health services research.

The three recipients are Dr Allison Milner, Dr Bernard Pope and Associate Professor Ilana Ackerman. Read more >

Researcher in Residence – Meet Dr Michelle Hall

Researcher in Residence – Meet Dr Michelle Hall

Dr Michelle Hall (Centre of Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, University of Melbourne) is participating in BioMedVic’s flagship Policy Skills development program, Researcher In Residence. She has been in Canberra for two weeks with Senator Kim Carr, Senator for Victoria in the Australian Parliament, Shadow Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research.

“My glimpse into the parliamentary process has been tremendously insightful, and thanks to BioMedVic and Senator Carr I have made meaningful connections that I hope in time will reduce the burden of musculoskeletal conditions in Australia and world-wide.” – Dr Michelle Hall
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Research Expo Excellence

Research Expo Excellence

A big thank you goes to all the representatives from Victorian biomedical research organisations who helped make the 2017 Victorian Honours & PhD Expo such a huge success!

Over 150 keen students walked through the Expo doors to speak to representatives from 20 exhibiting organisations about research opportunities – and the room’s noise levels matched the students’ enthusiasm.

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